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Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
ZHUHAI-1 03A
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 19
201944534U9752350295Tracking
ZHUHAI-1 03B
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 19
201944536U9752050595Tracking
ZHUHAI-1 03C
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 19
201944537U9751950695Tracking
ZHUHAI-1 03D
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 19
201944538U9751950695Tracking
ZHUHAI-1 03E
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 19
201944539U9751850795Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M23
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 23
201944542U552210821546786Tracking
BEIDOU-3 M24
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 23
201944543U552154821507773Tracking
YZ-1 R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 22
201944544U552221422031798Tracking
CZ-3B R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 23
201944545U5518528200328Tracking
HTV-8 (KOUNOTORI 8)
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 24
201944546U5242141193Tracking
YUNHAI 1-02
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 25
201944547U99784782101Tracking
CZ-2D R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 25
201944548U98766756100Tracking
CZ-2D DEB
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 27
201944549U99799740100Tracking
SOYUZ-MS 15
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 25
201944550U5242141193Tracking
COSMOS 2541
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 26
201944552U64387251624718Tracking
FREGAT R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Sep 25
201944553U64385591638715Tracking
GAOFEN 10R
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 4
201944622U9862862797Tracking
CZ-4C R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 4
201944623U9861143595Tracking
EUTELSAT 5 WEST B
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 9
201944624U364847303762081Tracking
MEV-1
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 10
201944625U1064861148281648Tracking
BREEZE-M DEB [TANK]
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 9
201944627U5019333366343Tracking
ICON
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 11
201944628U2760657997Tracking
PEGASUS R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 11
201944629U2760257996Tracking
2019-069A
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 17
201944634U881205309100Tracking
2019-069B
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 17
201944635U881206309100Tracking
2019-069C
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 17
201944636U88119318899Tracking
2019-070A
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 17
201944637U2735809199632Tracking
2019-070B
1st orbit: 2019 Oct 17
201944638U2734972197615Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

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