Brazil  Portugal  English
Recently Launched Satellites
In this category are all objects launched in the last 30 days and includes cargo resupply to the ISS (International Space Station) as well as those satellites placed in orbit from the ISS. Most of the satellites seen in this list are geostationary communications equipment.
Satellite Launch Norad Incl.
degrees
Apogee
Km
Perigee
Km
Period
min
Options
YAOGAN-30 N
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 26
201944449U3560259697Tracking
YAOGAN-30 P
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 26
201944450U3560659297Tracking
YAOGAN-30 Q
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 26
201944451U3560059897Tracking
CZ-2C R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 27
201944452U3559845295Tracking
MERIDIAN 8
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 30
201944453U6339369984718Tracking
FREGAT R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 30
201944454U6339569885720Tracking
PROGRESS-MS 12
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 31
201944455U5242141093Tracking
COSMOS 2539
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 28
201944457U036043358711445Tracking
BREEZE-M R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 14
201944458U042100355871595Tracking
BREEZE-M DEB [TANK]
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 13
201944459U4935711390633Tracking
EDRS-C
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 30
201944475U035787357381435Tracking
INTELSAT 39
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 3
201944476U035724342121394Tracking
ARIANE 5 R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 6
201944477U535522216626Tracking
ARIANE 5 DEB [SYLDA]
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 6
201944478U535703236630Tracking
AMOS-17
1st orbit: 2019 Jul 30
201944479U035793357791436Tracking
FALCON 9 R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 7
201944480U2635687220630Tracking
AEHF-5 (USA 292)
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 7
201944481U835259251381160Tracking
TDO SPACECRAFT
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 8
201944482U2635474200625Tracking
ATLAS 5 CENTAUR R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 8
201944483U103531313853904Tracking
AEROCUBE 10B (DOUGSAT)
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 7
201944484U5248547294Tracking
AEROCUBE 10A (JIMSAT)
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 7
201944485U5248547194Tracking
2019-052A
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 17
201944486U9855953296Tracking
2019-052B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 17
201944487U9855952996Tracking
2019-052C
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 17
201944488U9856052996Tracking
CHINASAT 18 (ZX 18)
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944493U2835784224631Tracking
CZ-3B R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944494U2834356179603Tracking
2019-054A
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944495U4554729593Tracking
2019-054B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944496U4555053896Tracking
2019-054C
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944497U4555053495Tracking
2019-054D
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944498U4555053295Tracking
2019-054E
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 19
201944499U4555053796Tracking
SOYUZ-MS 14
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 22
201944504U5242041393Tracking
SL-4 R/B
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 22
201944505U5219317688Tracking
NAVSTAR 78 (USA 293)
1st orbit: 2019 Aug 22
201944506U55201741195370Tracking
Satellites Orbital Parameters

The table above shows the main parameters and information available for this satellite.

Satellite: This column shows the name of the object in orbit. In some cases the official name ends with the words R/B, meaning that it is a piece or any stage from some rocket booster.

Norad: North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Air Defence Command of the United States, responsible for the catalogue of objects in orbit. The number indicates the record of the satellite in the Norad archives.

Inclination: Angle formed between the orbit of the satellite and terrestrial line of the equator. Satellites with inclination of 0 degrees follow the equator line and are called equatorial orbit satellites. When the inclination is 90 degrees its orbit crosses the terrestrial poles and are called polar orbiting satellites. When the inclination is less or equal latitude of the place of observation, the satellite be seen directly if conditions permit.

Apogee: Maximum distance that the object is far from the center of the Earth.

Perigee: Highest approchement between the object and the center of the Earth. The figures shown already discounting the radius of the Earth, 6378 Km. One Perigee value equal to the value of Apogee indicates a circular orbit satellite.

Period: Value in minutes that a satellite takes to complete one orbit of perigee to perigee. Satellites in polar orbit, positioned at 800 km in altitude will take approximately 102 minutes to complete one revolution. The International Space Station, 350 km above the surface, completes its orbit in 90 minutes.

The lower the altitude of a satellite, more speed he needs to keep in orbit and not re-enters the atmosphere.

Geostationary satellites have a period of approximately 1436 minutes with inclination of 0 degrees (equatorial orbit). Because this is the same time it takes Earth to complete one turn on its axis, geostationary satellites appear static on the same geographic point. To this happens the satellite should be positioned about 36 thousand kilometers in altitude.

Note and Frequency: Filled with additional information where possible. The frequencies shown, when provided, are those captured by enthusiasts or informed by the official organizations of disclosure.

Satview - All Rights Reserved 2008 - 2019
Privacy policy